Update May 28th, 2020 Class Update

Please send your name, class number, date and confirmation of attendance to the Registration Officer, email address: ro@iqcia.org

Schedule (Pending Pandemic and Government Guidelines)
Houston, TX               TES  Class # 2020241 June   8th – 12th, 2020
Los Angeles, CA        TES  Class # 2020236 June 15th – 19th, 2020

Due to the Covid – 19 Pandemic, classes are restricted to 10 Candidates.

TANK ENTRY SUPERVISOR CERTIFICATION

Covid – 19 Pandemic

Moving Forward

The IQCIA Executive Board has been monitoring the Covid 19 Pandemic situation closely. The IQC Program Board submitted protocol, procedures and safe work practices concerning the Covid-19 Pandemic on Wednesday May 25th for approval. 

The IQCIA Executive Board and IQC Program Board have the number one focus being the safety and health of the Candidates and IQCIA Team Members. The Pandemic effects have been felt by everyone World Wide, we appreciate your understanding, patience and assistance in preventing the spread of this horrible invisible virus. We shall all navigate together through the “new normal” for moving forward in the safest way possible as we open the economy.

The Board has compiled the required measures to comply with Federal Guidelines, OSHA, CDC, FEMA, and each State; to establish the safest practices in presenting the IQC Tank Entry Supervisor Program. The Board has limited the Qualifying Certification Officers to just one instructor. David Bush, the IQCIA Master Qualifying Certification Officer, will be the QCO (instructor) for all classes until further notice.

The Board will not risk the exposure to the other IQCIA QCO (instructors). David received additional Covid-19 Testing on Friday the 15th and test results were negative. The IQC Executive Board deemed Air Travel as High Risk and mandated travel restricted to vehicle only.

The IQCIA Executive Board decisions and approved procedures and protocols will be updated on the web site Friday May 29th, with the adjusted IQC TES Class schedule for Houston, Los Angeles, and Canada. The approved IQCIA procedures shall be sent to all candidates and the respective safety and health leader for each candidate’s company. All questions and any concerns will be addressed prior to the scheduled classes.

Please review the following information.

                         IQC TANK ENTRY SUPERVISOR CERTIFICATION

                       IQC TES Classes Pandemic Classroom Adjustments
Classes Maximum 10 Candidates per Class


                                                   Class Room Diagram
10′ x 10′ Square for each desk and chair 10′ space in Columns X 20′ Rows

Front Screen

Candidate 1                                                                                              Candidate 2

                                     x————— Air Filters ——————x

Candidate 3                                                                                              Candidate 4

                                     x————— Air Filters ——————x

Candidate 5                                                                                              Candidate 6

                                     x————— Air Filters ——————x

Candidate 7                                                                                              Candidate 8

                                      x————— Air Filters ——————x

Candidate 9                                                                                              Candidate 10

                                                     Instructor Table

Protocol for Attending IQCIA Classes

Masks are Mandatory

Gloves are Mandatory

Temperature Checks prior to entering classroom

Social Distancing Mandatory

Desk stations will be marked by red tape in 10’ x 10’ square social distance spaces for each candidate. Desk stations will be assigned.

Candidates must maintain a minimum of 6’ social distance from all participates

Hand Sanitizer bottle for each candidate and instructor Mandatory

Frequent hand washing required.

Breaks

During breaks, social distancing minimum of 6’ from other participates

Hand washing or sanitizer prior to re-entering classroom.

Classroom

Desk Stations numbered, assigned and marked by Red Tape 10 x 10 squares

Air Purifying Filters located as per classroom drawing.

Disinfect desk stations at the end of each day

Disinfect all surfaces in classroom daily

Maintain social distancing in classroom

Limit Candidates in one class at 10 Maximum

Qualification Certification Officer (Instructor)

Covid – 19 Tested with Negative result 14 days in advance of scheduled class.

Maintain self-isolation 14 days prior to scheduled class

Show NO symptoms of the Covid – 19 Virus

Air Travel is not allowed

Candidates

Stay home if sick, showing symptoms, re-schedule.

Follow CDC and OSHA Covid – 19 Guidelines

Follow IQCIA Procedures and Protocols for IQC Program Classes

OSHA Guidelines

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970“To assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women; by authorizing enforcement of the standards developed under the Act; by assisting and encouraging the States in their efforts to assure safe and healthful working conditions; by providing for research, information, education, and training in the field of occupational safety and health.”

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides the latest information about COVID-19 and the global outbreak: www. cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov.

The OSHA COVID-19 webpage offers information specifically for workers and employers: www.osha.gov/covid-19.This guidance is advisory in nature and informational in content. It is not a standard or a regulation, and it neither creates new legal obligations nor alters existing obligations created by OSHA standards or the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act). Pursuant to the OSH Act, employers must comply with safety and health standards and regulations issued and enforced either by OSHA or by an OSHA-approved State Plan. In addition, the OSH Act’s General Duty Clause, Section 5(a)(1), requires employers to provide their employees with a workplace free from recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm. OSHA-approved State Plans may have standards, regulations and enforcement policies that are different from, but at least as effective as, OSHA’s. Check with your State Plan, as applicable, for more information.

About COVID-19 Symptoms of COVID-19

Infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can cause illness ranging from mild to severe and, in some cases, can be fatal. Symptoms typically include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Some people infected with the virus have reported experiencing other non-respiratory symptoms. Other people, referred to as asymptomatic cases, have experienced no symptoms at all.

According to the CDC, symptoms of COVID-19 may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure.

GUIDANCE ON PREPARING WORKPLACES FOR COVID-19

How COVID-19 Spreads

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person, including:

■   Between people who are in close contact with one another
(within about 6 feet).
■   Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs
or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who
are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has SARS-CoV-2 on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the primary way the virus spreads. People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (i.e., experiencing fever, cough, and/or shortness of breath).

Policies and Procedures for Prompt Identification and Isolation of Sick People, if Appropriate

■   Prompt identification and isolation of potentially infectious individuals is a critical step in protecting workers, customers, visitors, and others at a worksite.

■   Employers should inform and encourage employees to self-monitor for signs and symptoms of COVID-19 if they suspect possible exposure.

■   Employers should develop policies and procedures for employees to report when they are sick or experiencing symptoms of COVID-19.


■   Where appropriate, employers should develop policies and procedures for immediately isolating people who have signs and/or symptoms of COVID-19, and train workers to implement them. Move potentially infectious people to a location away from workers, customers, and other visitors. Although most worksites do not have specific isolation rooms,
designated areas with closable doors may serve as isolation rooms until potentially sick people can be removed from the worksite.

■   Take steps to limit spread of the respiratory secretions of a person who may have COVID-19. Provide a face mask, if feasible and available, and ask the person to wear it, if tolerated.

Note: A face mask (also called a surgical mask, procedure mask, or other similar terms) on a patient or other sick person should not be confused with PPE for a worker; the mask acts to contain potentially infectious respiratory secretions at the source (i.e., the person’s nose and mouth).

■   If possible, isolate people suspected of having COVID-19 separately from those with confirmed cases of the virus to prevent further transmission—particularly in worksites where medical screening, triage, or healthcare activities occur, using either permanent (e.g., wall/different room) or temporary barrier (e.g., plastic sheeting).

■   Restrict the number of personnel entering isolation areas.

■   Protect workers in close contact with (i.e., within 6 feet of) a sick person or who have prolonged/repeated contact with such persons by using additional engineering and administrative controls, safe work practices, and PPE. Workers whose activities involve close or prolonged/repeated contact with sick people are addressed further in later sections covering workplaces classified at medium and very high or high exposure risk.

Engineering Controls

Engineering controls involve isolating employees from work-related hazards. In workplaces where they are appropriate, these types of controls reduce exposure to hazards without relying on worker behavior and can be the most cost-effective solution to implement. Engineering controls for SARS-CoV-2 include:

■   Installing high-efficiency air filters.

■   Increasing ventilation rates in the work environment.

■   Installing physical barriers, such as clear plastic sneeze guards.


Administrative Controls

Administrative controls require action by the worker or employer. Typically, administrative controls are changes in work policy or procedures to reduce or minimize exposure to a hazard. Examples of administrative controls for SARS-CoV-2 include:

■   Encouraging sick workers to stay at home.

■   Minimizing contact among workers, clients, and customers by replacing face-to-face meetings with virtual communications and implementing teleworking if feasible.

■   Establishing alternating days or extra shifts that reduce the total number of employees in a facility at a given time, allowing them to maintain distance from one another while maintaining a full onsite work week.

■   Discontinuing nonessential travel to locations with ongoing COVID-19 outbreaks. Regularly check CDC travel warning levels at: www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers.

■   Developing emergency communications plans, including a forum for answering workers’ concerns and internet-based communications, if feasible.

■   Providing workers with up-to-date education and training on COVID-19 risk factors and    protective behaviors (e.g., cough etiquette and care of PPE).

■  Training workers who need to use protecting clothing and equipment how to put it on, use/wear it, and take it off correctly, including in the context of their current and potential duties. Training material should be easy to understand and available in the appropriate language and literacy level for all workers.

Safe Work Practices

Safe work practices are types of administrative controls that include procedures for safe and proper work used to reduce the duration, frequency, or intensity of exposure to a hazard. Examples of safe work practices for SARS-CoV-2 include:

■    Providing resources and a work environment that promotes personal hygiene. For example, provide tissues, no-touch trash cans, hand soap, alcohol-based hand rubs containing at least 60 percent alcohol, disinfectants, and disposable towels for workers to clean their work
surfaces.
■ Requiring regular hand washing or using of alcohol-based hand rubs. Workers should always wash hands when they are visibly soiled and after removing any PPE.
■    Post handwashing signs in restrooms. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) While engineering and administrative controls are considered more effective in minimizing exposure to SARS-CoV-2, PPE may also be needed to prevent certain exposures. While correctly using PPE can help prevent some exposures, it should not take the place of other prevention strategies. Examples of PPE include: gloves, goggles, face shields, face masks, and respiratory protection, when appropriate. During an outbreak of an infectious disease, such as COVID-19, recommendations for PPE specific to occupations or job tasks may change depending on geographic location, updated risk assessments for workers, and information on PPE effectiveness in preventing the spread of COVID-19. Employers should check the OSHA and CDC websites regularly for updates about recommended   PPE. All types of PPE must be:

■   Selected based upon the hazard to the worker.

■   Properly fitted and periodically refitted, as applicable (e.g., respirators).

■   Consistently and properly worn when required.

■   Regularly inspected, maintained, and replaced, as necessary.

■   Properly removed, cleaned, and stored or disposed of, as applicable, to avoid contamination of self, others, or the environment. Employers are obligated to provide their workers with PPE needed to keep them safe while performing their jobs. The types of PPE required during a COVID-19 outbreak will be based on the risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2
while working and job tasks that may lead to exposure. Workers, including those who work within 6 feet of patients known to be, or suspected of being, infected with SARS-CoV-2 and those performing aerosol-generating procedures, need to use respirators:

■   National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved, N95 filtering facepiece respirators or better must be used in the context of a comprehensive, written respiratory protection program that includes fit-testing, training, and medical exams. See OSHA’s Respiratory Protection standard, 29 CFR 1910.134 at:
     www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910/1910.134.

■   When disposable N95 filtering facepiece respirators are not available, consider using other respirators that provide greater protection and improve worker comfort. Other types of acceptable respirators include: a R/P95, N/R/P99, or N/R/P100 filtering facepiece respirator; an air-purifying elastomeric (e.g., half-face or full-face) respirator with appropriate filters or cartridges; powered air purifying respirator (PAPR) with high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA) filter; or supplied air respirator (SAR). See CDC/NIOSH guidance for optimizing respirator supplies at: www. cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/respirators-strategy.

■   Consider using PAPRs or SARs, which are more protective than filtering facepiece respirators, for any work operations or procedures likely to generate aerosols (e.g., cough induction procedures, some dental procedures, invasive specimen collection, blowing out pipettes, shaking or vortexing tubes, filling a syringe, centrifugation).

■   Use a surgical N95 respirator when both respiratory protection and resistance to blood and body fluids is needed.

■   Face shields may also be worn on top of a respirator to prevent bulk contamination of the respirator. Certain respirator designs with forward protrusions (duckbill style) may be difficult to properly wear under a face shield. Ensure that the face shield does not prevent airflow through the respirator.

■   Consider factors such as function, fit, ability to decontaminate, disposal, and cost. OSHA’s Respiratory Protection eTool provides basic information on respirators such as medical requirements, maintenance and care, fit testing, written respiratory protection programs, and voluntary use of respirators, which employers may also find beneficial in training workers at: www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/respiratory. Also see NIOSH respirator guidance at: www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/respirators.

■   Respirator training should address selection, use (including donning and doffing), proper disposal or disinfection, inspection for damage, maintenance, and the limitations of respiratory protection equipment. Learn more at: www.osha.gov/SLTC/respiratoryprotection.

■   The appropriate form of respirator will depend on the type of exposure and on the transmission pattern of COVID-19. See the NIOSH “Respirator Selection Logic” at: www. cdc. gov/niosh/docs/2005-100/default.htmlor the OSHA “Respiratory Protection eTool” at:
www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/respiratory.


Follow Existing OSHA Standards

Existing OSHA standards may apply to protecting workers from exposure to and infection with SARS-CoV-2. While there is no specific OSHA standard covering SARS-CoV-2 exposure, some OSHA requirements may apply to preventing occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2. Among the most relevant are:

■ OSHA’s Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) standards (in general industry, 29 CFR 1910 Subpart I), which require using gloves, eye and face protection, and respiratory protection.
See: www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910#1910_Subpart_I. {When respirators are necessary to protect workers or where employers require respirator use, employers must implement a comprehensive respiratory protection program in accordance with the Respiratory Protection standard (29 CFR 1910.134).

See: www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910/1910.134.

■The General Duty Clause, Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act of 1970, 29 USC 654(a)(1), which requires employers to furnish to each worker “employment and a place of employment, which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm.” See: www. osha. gov/laws-regs/oshact/completeoshact. OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030) applies to occupational exposure to human blood and other potentially infectious materials that typically do not include respiratory secretions that may transmit SARS-CoV-2. However, the provisions of the standard offer a framework that may help control some sources of the virus, including exposures to body fluids (e.g., respiratory secretions) not covered by the standard. See:
www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910/1910.1030.

Center for Disease Control
CDC

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Considerations for Schools

Updated May 19, 2020

As some communities in the United States open K-12 schools, CDC offers the following considerations for ways in which schools can help protect students, teachers, administrators, and staff and slow the spread of COVID-19. Schools can determine, in collaboration with state and local health officials to the extent possible, whether and how to implement these considerations while adjusting to meet the unique needs and circumstances of the local community. Implementation should be guided by what is feasible, practical, acceptable, and tailored to the needs of each community. School-based health facilities may refer to CDC’s Guidance for U.S. Healthcare Facilities and may find it helpful to reference the Ten Ways Healthcare Systems Can Operate Effectively During the COVID-19 Pandemic. These considerations are meant to supplement—not replace—any state, local, territorial, or tribal health and safety laws, rules, and regulations with which schools must comply.

Guiding Principles to Keep in Mind

The more people a student or staff member interacts with, and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. The risk of COVID-19 spread increases in school settings as follows:

  • Lowest Risk: Students and teachers engage in virtual-only classes, activities, and events.
  • More Risk: Small, in-person classes, activities, and events. Groups of students stay together and with the same teacher throughout/across school days and groups do not mix. Students remain at least 6 feet apart and do not share objects (e.g., hybrid virtual and in-person class structures, or staggered/rotated scheduling to accommodate smaller class sizes).
  • Highest Risk: Full sized, in-person classes, activities, and events. Students are not spaced apart, share classroom materials or supplies, and mix between classes and activities.

COVID-19 is mostly spread by respiratory droplets released when people talk, cough, or sneeze. It is thought that the virus may spread to hands from a contaminated surface and then to the nose or mouth, causing infection. Therefore, personal prevention practices (such as handwashing, staying home when sick) and environmental cleaning and disinfection are important principles that are covered in this document. Fortunately, there are a number of actions school administrators can take to help lower the risk of COVID-19 exposure and spread during school sessions and activities.


Promoting Behaviors that Reduce Spread

Schools may consider implementing several strategies to encourage behaviors that reduce the spread of COVID-19.

  • Staying Home when Appropriate
  • Educate staff and families about when they/their child(ren) should stayhome and when they can return to school.
    • Actively encourage employees and students who are sick or who have recently had closecontact with a person with COVID-19 to stay home. Develop policies that encourage sick employees and students to stay at home without fear of reprisal, and ensure employees, students, and students’ families are aware of these policies. Consider not having perfect attendance awards, not assessing schools based on absenteeism, and offering virtual learning and telework options, if feasible.
    • Staffand students should stay home if they have tested positive for or are showing COVID-19 symptoms.
    • Staff and students who have recently had closecontact with a person with COVID-19 should also stay home and monitor their health.
  • CDC’s criteria can help inform when employees should return to work:
  • Hand Hygiene and Respiratory Etiquette
    • Teach and reinforce handwashing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and increase monitoring to ensure adherence among students and staff.
      • If soap and water are not readily available, hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol can be used (for staff and older children who can safely use hand sanitizer).
    • Encourage staff and students to cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue. Used tissues should be thrown in the trash and hands washed immediately with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
      • If soap and water are not readily available, hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol can be used (for staff and older children who can safely use hand sanitizer).

  • Cloth Face Coverings
    • Teach and reinforce use of cloth face coverings. Face coverings may be challenging for students (especially younger students) to wear in all-day settings such as school. Face coverings should be worn by staff and students (particularly older students) as feasible, and are most essential in times when physical distancing is difficult. Individuals should be frequently reminded not to touch the face covering and to wash their hands frequently. Information should be provided to staff, students, and students’ families on proper use, removal, and washing of cloth face coverings.
      • Note: Cloth face coverings should not be placed on:
        • Children younger than 2 years old
        • Anyone who has trouble breathing or is unconscious
        • Anyone who is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the cloth face covering without assistance
    • Cloth face coverings are meant to protect other people in case the wearer is unknowingly infected but does not have symptoms. Cloth face coverings are not surgical masks, respirators, or other medical personal protective equipment.
  • Adequate Supplies
    • Support healthy hygiene behaviors by providing adequate supplies, including soap, hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol (for staff and older children who can safely use hand sanitizer), paper towels, tissues, disinfectant wipes, cloth face coverings (as feasible) and no-touch/foot-pedal trash cans.
  • Signs and Messages

Maintaining Healthy Environments

Schools may consider implementing several strategies to maintain healthy environments.

  • Cleaning and Disinfection
    • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces (e.g., playground equipment, door handles, sink handles, drinking fountains) within the school and on school buses at least daily or between use as much as possible. Use of shared objects (e.g., gym or physical education equipment, art supplies, toys, games) should be limited when possible, or cleaned between use.
    • If transport vehicles (e.g., buses) are used by the school, drivers should practice all safety actions and protocols as indicated for other staff (e.g., hand hygiene, cloth face coverings). To clean and disinfect school buses or other transport vehicles, see guidance for bus transit operators.
    • Develop a schedule for increased, routine cleaning and disinfection.
    • Ensure safe and correct use and storage of cleaning and disinfection productsexternal icon, including storing products securely away from children. Use products that meet EPA disinfection criteriaexternal icon.
    • Cleaning products should not be used near children, and staff should ensure that there is adequate ventilation when using these products to prevent children or themselves from inhaling toxic fumes.
  • Shared Objects
    • Discourage sharing of items that are difficult to clean or disinfect.
    • Keep each child’s belongings separated from others’ and in individually labeled containers, cubbies, or areas.
    • Ensure adequate supplies to minimize sharing of high touch materials to the extent possible (e.g., assigning each student their own art supplies, equipment) or limit use of supplies and equipment by one group of children at a time and clean and disinfect between use.
    • Avoid sharing electronic devices, toys, books, and other games or learning aids.
  • Ventilation
    • Ensure ventilation systems operate properly and increase circulation of outdoor air as much as possible, for example by opening windows and doors. Do not open windows and doors if doing so poses a safety or health risk (e.g., risk of falling, triggering asthma symptoms) to children using the facility.

  • Water Systems
    • To minimize the risk of Legionnaire’s disease and other diseases associated with water, take steps to ensure that all water systems and features (e.g., sink faucets, drinking fountains, decorative fountains) are safe to use after a prolonged facility shutdown. Drinking fountains should be cleaned and sanitized, but encourage staff and students to bring their own water to minimize use and touching of water fountains.
  • Modified Layouts
    • Space seating/desks at least 6 feet apart when feasible.
    • Turn desks to face in the same direction (rather than facing each other), or have students sit on only one side of tables, spaced apart.
    • Create distance between children on school buses (g., seat children one child per row, skip rows) when possible.

  • Physical Barriers and Guides
    • Install physical barriers, such as sneeze guards and partitions, particularly in areas where it is difficult for individuals to remain at least 6 feet apart (e.g., reception desks).
    • Provide physical guides, such as tape on floors or sidewalks and signs on walls, to ensure that staff and children remain at least 6 feet apart in lines and at other times (e.g. guides for creating “one way routes” in hallways).
  • Communal Spaces
    • Close communal use shared spaces such as dining halls and playgrounds with shared playground equipment if possible; otherwise, stagger use and clean and disinfect between use.
    • Add physical barriers, such as plastic flexible screens, between bathroom sinks especially when they cannot be at least 6 feet apart.
  • Food Service
    • Have children bring their own meals as feasible, or serve individually plated meals in classrooms instead of in a communal dining hall or cafeteria, while ensuring the safety of children with food allergies.pdf icon
    • Use disposable food service items (e.g., utensils, dishes). If disposable items are not feasible or desirable, ensure that all non-disposable food service items are handled with gloves and washed with dish soap and hot water or in a dishwasher. Individuals should wash their hands after removing their gloves or after directly handling used food service items.
    • If food is offered at any event, have pre-packaged boxes or bags for each attendee instead of a buffet or family-style meal. Avoid sharing food and utensils and ensure the safety of children with food allergies.pdf icon



Maintaining Healthy Operations
Schools may consider implementing several strategies to maintain healthy operations.

  • Protections for Staff and Children at Higher Risk for Severe Illness from COVID-19
    • Offer options for staff at higher risk for severe illness (including older adults and people of all ages with certain underlying medical conditions) that limit their exposure risk (e.g., telework, modified job responsibilities that limit exposure risk).
    • Offer options for students at higher risk of severe illness that limit their exposure risk (e.g., virtual learning opportunities).
    • Consistent with applicable law, put in place policies to protect the privacy of people at higher risk for severe illness regarding underlying medical conditions.
  • Regulatory Awareness
    • Be aware of local or state regulatory agency policies related to group gatherings to determine if events can be held.
  • Gatherings, Visitors, and Field Trips
    • Pursue virtual group events, gatherings, or meetings, if possible, and promote social distancing of at least 6 feet between people if events are held. Limit group size to the extent possible.
    • Limit any nonessential visitors, volunteers, and activities involving external groups or organizations as possible – especially with individuals who are not from the local geographic area (e.g., community, town, city, county).
    • Pursue virtual activities and events in lieu of field trips, student assemblies, special performances, school-wide parent meetings, and spirit nights, as possible.
    • Pursue options to convene sporting events and participation in sports activities in ways that minimizes the risk of transmission of COVID-19 to players, families, coaches, and communities.
  • Identifying Small Groups and Keeping Them Together (Cohorting)
    • Ensure that student and staff groupings are as static as possible by having the same group of children stay with the same staff (all day for young children, and as much as possible for older children).
    • Limit mixing between groups if possible.

  • Staggered Scheduling
    • Stagger arrival and drop-off times or locations by cohort or put in place other protocols to limit contact between cohorts and direct contact with parents as much as possible.
    • When possible, use flexible worksites (e.g., telework) and flexible work hours (e.g., staggered shifts) to help establish policies and practices for social distancing (maintaining distance of approximately 6 feet) between employees and others, especially if social distancing is recommended by state and local health authorities.
  • Designated COVID-19 Point of Contact
    • Designate a staff person to be responsible for responding to COVID-19 concerns (e.g., school nurse). All school staff and families should know who this person is and how to contact them.
  • Participation in Community Response Efforts
    • Consider participating with local authorities in broader COVID-19 community response efforts (e.g., sitting on community response committees).
  • Communication Systems
    • Put systems in place for:
      • Consistent with applicable law and privacy policies, having staff and families self-report to the school if they or their student have symptoms of COVID-19, a positive test for COVID-19, or were exposed to someone with COVID-19 within the last 14 days in accordance with:
        health information sharing regulations for COVID-19external icon (e.g. see “Notify Health Officials and Close Contacts” in the Preparing for When Someone Gets Sick section below) and other applicable federal and state laws and regulations relating to privacy and confidentiality, such as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
      • Notifying staff, families, and the public of school closures and any restrictions in place to limit COVID-19 exposure (e.g., limited hours of operation).

  • Leave (Time Off) Policies and Excused Absence Policies
    • Implement flexible sick leave policies and practices that enable staff to stay home when they are sick, have been exposed, or caring for someone who is sick.
      • Examine and revise policies for leave, telework, and employee compensation.
      • Leave policies should be flexible and not punish people for taking time off, and should allow sick employees to stay home and away from co-workers. Leave policies should also account for employees who need to stay home with their children if there are school or childcare closures, or to care for sick family members.
    • Develop policies for return-to-school after COVID-19 illness. CDC’s criteria to discontinue home isolation and quarantine can inform these policies.
  • Back-Up Staffing Plan
    • Monitor absenteeism of students and employees, cross-train staff, and create a roster of trained back-up staff.
  • Staff Training
    • Train staff on all safety protocols.
    • Conduct training virtually or ensure that social distancing is maintained during training.
  • Recognize Signs and Symptoms
    • If feasible, conduct daily health checks (e.g., temperature screening and/or or symptom checking) of staff and students.
    • Health checks should be conducted safely and respectfully, and in accordance with any applicable privacy laws and regulations. School administrators may use examples of screening methods in CDC’s supplemental Guidance for Child Care Programs that Remain Open as a guide for screening children and CDC’s General Business FAQs for screening staff.
  • Sharing Facilities
    • Encourage any organizations that share or use the school facilities to also follow these considerations.
  • Support Coping and Resilience 
    • Encourage employees and students to take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories about COVID-19, including social media if they are feeling overwhelmed or distressed.
    • Promote employees and students eating healthy, exercising, getting sleep, and finding time to unwind.
    • Encourage employees and students to talk with people they trust about their concerns and how they are feeling.
    • Consider posting signage’s for the national distress hotline: 1-800-985-5990, or text TalkWithUsto66746

Preparing for When Someone Gets Sick

Schools may consider implementing several strategies to prepare for when someone gets sick.

  • Advise Staff and Families of Sick Students of Home
    Isolation Criteria
  • Isolate and Transport Those Who are Sick
    • Make sure that staff and families know that they (staff) or their children (families) should not come to school, and that they should notify school officials (e.g., the designated COVID-19 point of contact) if they (staff) or their child (families) become sick with COVID-19 symptoms, test positive for COVID-19, or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 symptoms or a confirmed or suspected case.
    • Immediately separate staff and children with COVID-19 symptoms (such as fever, cough, or shortness of breath) at school. Individuals who are sick should go home or to a healthcare facility depending on how severe their symptoms are, and follow CDC guidance for caring for oneself and others who are sick.
    • Work with school administrators, nurses, and other healthcare providers to identify an isolation room or area to separate anyone who has COVID-19 symptoms or tests positive but does not have symptoms. School nurses and other healthcare providers should use Standard and Transmission-Based Precautions when caring for sick people. See:
      What Healthcare Personnel Should Know About Caring for Patients with Confirmed or Possible COVID-19 Infection.
    • Establish procedures for safely transporting anyone who is sick to their home or to a healthcare facility. If you are calling an ambulance or bringing someone to the hospital, try to call first to alert them that the person may have COVID-19.
  • Clean and Disinfect
  • Notify Health Officials and Close Contacts


Additional Information from the CDC
(Links for additional information):

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)                

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